Saturday, January 05, 2008

On Politics and Faith
...quote of the day by Al Mohler


Two powerful excerpts from the sagely pen of Al Mohler
on the current state of the Presidential race.

I would encourage you to read the entire article linked below.


"The rhetoric of the race -- and the rhetoric of many evangelicals -- is disturbing. This race is important and necessarily so. We are talking about the next President of the United States, after all. But evangelicals have invested far too much hope in the political process. No government can make people good, transform humanity, or eliminate sin. The political sphere is important, but never ultimate. Jesus Christ is Lord -- and He will be Lord regardless of who sits in the Oval Office. (emphasis mine)



"Americans should give thanks today, mindful of the fact that our democratic process is evidence of national stability and constitutional order. The U.S. Constitution is the world's longest-surviving political charter. For a contrast, just think of the political turmoil and tragedy seen in Pakistan and Kenya in just the last week. Our political process may be only rarely graceful or predictable -- but it is still one of the wonders of the world. Stay tuned." (emphasis mine)

Read the entire article.

15 comments:

Arthur Sido said...

There are few men who possess a more serious and sober pen than Dr. Mohler. He is a prophetic voice of the hope of the Gospel and of warning in a culture gone amok.

SJ Camp said...

Arthur:
I fully agree.

Al has once again proven to be one of the key evangelical voices in analyzing current political trends for the church.

May the Lord grant us the wisdom to walk faithfully as citizens of this land, as we are motivated to live for the One in glory as faithful citizens of heaven.

I appreciate you Art!

dec said...

But evangelicals have invested far too much hope in the political process.

As one who did just that in the past, and regrets having placed hope in a politician, I am disappointed that some Christian bloggers are going beyond the discussion of candidates' positions to now advocating for candidates' nominations.

Al Mohler also said:
This presidential race offers evangelical Christians an opportunity to mature and rethink our model of political engagement.

I urge Dr. Mohler to be front and center in this rethinking.

SJ Camp said...

dec
Thank you brother and amen! I couldn't agree more.

The hope for our nation is not legislation but transformation in the power of the gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ.

We can make our voices known on political issues, but let's not place more trust in it than we biblically and pragmatically should.

I so thank you for your insights here today.

Connie said...

The first quote you selected/presented is the one that stood out to me--and I posted on my blog!

I've spent the last 16 yrs. intentionally on the 'sidelines' of our political scene after getting WAY too wrapped up in it when Clinton beat Bush, Sr. in '92. It was a 'wake up' call for me as I have been and continue to be fully pursuaded of God's sovereignty over all--including politics/governments.

littlegal_66 said...

"The political sphere is important, but never ultimate. Jesus Christ is Lord -- and He will be Lord regardless of who sits in the Oval Office."

I just watched the New Hampshire debates, and consequently, I'm finding great solace just now in Dr. Mohler's above quote. So glad my hope is in Christ, and not in the next occupant of the White House........whomever he (or she [shudder])...may turn out to be.

junkyardboyz said...

i believe that it is my personal responsibility to vote and that vote is private.

foremost, today's national and world problems are spiritual.
Romans 1.

however, in the current political climate we have been assailed by one who has, time and time again, proven he does not meet the standards of a prophet and now another who abandons the great commission for political gain.

what i find distressing is "the church's" lack of exposing these wolves in sheep's clothing and as an "evangelical" block running after this so called pastor.

SJ Camp said...

junkyardboyz
in the current political climate we have been assailed by one who has, time and time again, proven he does not meet the standards of a prophet and now another who abandons the great commission for political gain.

Whom specifically are you referring to?
Steve

junkyardboyz said...

greetings steve,
the first that i refer to is pat robertson.
the second sadly, is huckabee who i heard on bill o'reilly avoid the question "what happens to those that don't believe in Jesus as you do?"
rather than boldly proclaim the gospel he chose instead to hide behind "i am going to be president for all people".
tragic when a pastor puts the gospel behind his political ambition.
i agree with dr. mohler, we need to "rethink our model of political engagement." he just says it far better than i.

SJ Camp said...

junkyardboyz
Thank you for clarifying this.

Pat Robertson had made several predictions that have never come true. It is a concern when people claim to speak for God in this manner and their words come up empty.

I have also seen Huckabee vacillate on what would be clear biblical or spiritual issues. As a Christian he can speak plainly and boldly where the Scriptures do; and as a candidate for President he can speak politically to the issues of the day. I don't understand the problem.

Once again, Mohler's words prove very helpful and true.

Steve
2 Cor. 4:5-7

Debbie said...

Dr. Mohler is absolutely right! Living in northern Virginia, just outside the beltway, politics can permeate every aspect of life when not kept in check. I'm learning to listen, read and filter it all through the lens of Scripture -- it really does make all the difference!

Some of the first posts I read here at A1M over a year ago were so very convicting and instructive with respect to the intersection of politics and faith -- I'm thankful for a new perspective.

Lane Chaplin said...

No government can make people good, transform humanity, or eliminate sin. The political sphere is important, but never ultimate. Jesus Christ is Lord -- and He will be Lord regardless of who sits in the Oval Office.

What a great point. I was just listening to an old debate a few days ago that James White had on a radio program on the issue of fundamentalism and politics. It was recorded about the same time that Robertson was running for president. James made the point that there can be many things done in the name of fundamentalism that has nothing to do with the fundamentals of Christianity. I believe that Mohler emphasizes James' point in what he says about "evangelicals investing far too much hope in the political process." I believe it's a direct result of getting away from the fundamentals of what Christianity actually is that has lead to many professing evangelicals becoming overly concerned with the political process.

I might have just restated Mohler's point, but with different words. Oh, well...

Thanks for posting this, Steve. Take care.

junkyardboyz said...

"I have also seen Huckabee vacillate on what would be clear biblical or spiritual issues. As a Christian he can speak plainly and boldly where the Scriptures do; and as a candidate for President he can speak politically to the issues of the day. I don't understand the problem."

greetings steve,
please excuse my confusion.
i am not attempting to be arguementative but i am unsure of what exactly you are saying.
here is a man, former pastor assuming called of God, who has admittedly vacillated in his pronouncements of clear christian doctrine, who when asked to proclaim the gospel before literally millions, instead opted to hid behind a declaration "i'm running for president of all people".
is that not a horrible division of loyalty at best?
here is one who uses his evangelical roots to further his political ambitions.
should this not be of concern to us?
thank you for your consideration,
peter

ianjmatt said...

"Americans should give thanks today, mindful of the fact that our democratic process is evidence of national stability and constitutional order. The U.S. Constitution is the world's longest-surviving political charter"

That's not true. The Magna Carta still forms the bedrock of the British constitution, and even the Bill of Rights was from 1689 which defines the role of the Crown as governing by the will of the people expressed in Parliament, and protects the individual from the opression of the state.

The US constitution is not the longest-surviving political charter by a long way.

One Salient Oversight said...

Government, individuals and private enterprise can all change society for the better. They can also change society for the worse.

But they can't remove sin, and they can't bring salvation.